Geography Trips to Spectacular South Africa

Geography trips to South Africa take students to one of the most bio-diverse regions in the world, in a setting of stunning rock formations, such as Table Mountain and Blyde River Canyon. South Africa is home to some of the world’s most unique wild animals and stunning flora, which students will be able to witness in Kruger National Park and Kirstenbosch (one of eight National Botanical Gardens). Going on geography trips
to South Africa is both enriching and unforgettable for young learners.

Kirstenbosch

Kirstenbosch was founded in 1913 to preserve the unique flora of South Africa, and with a few minor exceptions, it only cultivates indigenous species. Its outdoor area is mainly dedicated to flora native to the Cape region, including a collection of the famous protea family. In a large conservatory it grows plants from other South African biomes, including savannah, fynbos and karoo. Kirstenbosch gives students on geography trips a valuable opportunity to study the remarkable diversity of South African flora up-close. The gardens are located on the eastern slopes of Table Mountain, with several walking trails leading from the gardens up the sides of the mountain.

Table Mountain

The iconic flat-topped Table Mountain overlooking the city of Cape Town is familiar to many people. Its smooth top is Ordovician quartzitic sandstone (commonly known as Table Mountain Sandstone), a form of rock that is highly resistant to erosion. Its shape encourages the formation of orographic clouds on its top that resemble a tablecloth. Bio-diversity on Table Mountain is remarkably high, with an estimated 2,200 flora species confined to the mountain. Many of these are threatened. The mountain is also notable for being the only terrestrial feature to give its name to a constellation: Mensa (‘The Table’) below Orion in the southern hemisphere. The unique landscape of Table Mountain is an excellent case study on geography trips to South Africa, as well as a stunning sight that will awe every student.

Blyde River Canyon

Another striking natural feature of South Africa is Blyde River Canyon. Carved into predominantly red sandstone, it is one of the largest canyons in the world, and may be the largest ‘green canyon’ due to the subtropical forest covering its slopes. It supports a diverse array of mammal, bird, fish and plant life. It makes another top destination for geography trips, demonstrating the breadth and beauty of biomes in South Africa.

Kruger National Park

One of the largest game reserves on the continent, Kruger National Park is an opportunity for students to see some of Africa’s most famous wildlife in a vast natural habitat. In addition to sighting the ‘Big Five’, students can see the different regions of plant life within the park: thorn trees and red bush-willow veld, knob-thorn and marula veld, red bush-willow and mopane veld, and shrub mopane veld.

How to Prepare A Winter Emergency Kit for Your Car

With these frigid cold temperatures, freezing rain and snow storms, it is important to be prepared for the worst. Whether you are a local driver or long distance commuter, always be prepared.

A roadside emergency can happen at any time, whether your car is new or old. A range of problems can cause it, from a tire failure or mechanical breakdown to running out of fuel. At best, it’s an annoyance; at worst, it can compromise your safety. Being prepared with a basic emergency kit can increase your safety, reduce stress, and help you get back on the road faster.

Even if you have roadside-assistance coverage or an automobile-club membership with roadside assistance, you usually need access to a phone in order to contact them and you may have to wait on the side of the road for an hour or more before help arrives.

Prepare an emergency car kit

A basic car kit should contain the following:

  • Food that won’t spoil, such as energy bars
  • Water–plastic bottles (replace them every six months)
  • Blanket
  • Extra clothing and shoes or boots
  • First aid kit with seatbelt cutter
  • Small shovel, scraper and snowbrush
  • Candle in a deep can and matches
  • Wind‑up flashlight
  • Whistle–in case you need to attract attention
  • Roadmaps

Items to keep in your trunk:

  • Sand, salt
  • Antifreeze and windshield washer fluid
  • Tow rope
  • Jumper cables
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Warning light or road flares

Survival tips:

  • Prepare your vehicle: Make sure you keep your gas tank at least half full.
  • Be easy to find: Tell someone where you are going and the route you will take.
  • If stuck: Tie a fluorescent flag (from your kit) on your antenna or hang it out the window.
  • At night, keep your dome light on. Rescue crews can see a small glow at a distance.
  • To reduce battery drain, use emergency flashers only if you hear approachingvehicles. If you’re with someone else, make sure at least one person is awake and keeping watch for help at all times.
  • Stay in your vehicle: Walking in a storm can be very dangerous. You might become lost or exhausted. Your vehicle is a good shelter.
  • Avoid Overexertion: Shoveling snow or pushing your car takes a lot of effort in storm conditions. Don’t risk a heart attack or injury. That work can also make you hot and sweaty. Wet clothing loses insulation value, making you susceptible to hypothermia.
  • Fresh Air: It’s better to be cold and awake than comfortably warm and sleepy. Snow can plug your vehicle’s exhaust system and cause deadly carbon monoxide gas to enter your car. Only run the engine for 10 minutes an hour and make sure the exhaust pipe is free of snow. Keeping a window open a crack while running the engine is also a good idea.
  • Don’t expect to be comfortable: You want to survive until you’re found. Follow all of these tips and remember to be safe and cautious during the winter season.